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Must-See Migraine Video with a Song to Get Stuck in Your Head

AnnaA couple of weeks ago, I attended the American Headache Society's annual scientific and the American Headache and Migraine Association's fourth annual patient conference in San Diego. I was there for nearly a week learning, networking, meeting new people, speaking on advocacy, and much more.

One of the highlights of the trip — one that I truly want to share with you — was meeting Anna Eidt and seeing a spectacular video she created presented at both meetings. The American Headache Society, American Migraine Foundation, and American Headache and Migraine Association conducted our first annual Migraine Moment Film Contest, which encouraged people with Migraine to produce short films that express their thoughts and feelings about their condition.  

Anna's Film, "This Day," was the first place winner. I have to admit that it brings tears to my eyes each time I watch it, and find it especially impressive that Anna wrote and performed the song that you hear throughout the video. It's a great song, one I get stuck in my head every time I hear it. But with this song, that's fine by me!

So, grab a tissue, and enjoy "This Day."

Congratulations, Anna! It was a pleasure to meet you and have some time to chat!

 

Live well,

PurpleRibbonTiny Teri1

 

 because a migraine is NOT "just a headache"

Visit MigraineDisease.com

 

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Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape© Teri Robert, 2016.

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Under the Hat for Migraine and Headache Awareness

Under-the-Hat-AHMAAs a part of Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, the American Headache and Migraine Association (AHMA) is participating in the European Headache Alliance's "What's Under the Hat?" initiative to raise public awareness of Headache Disorders. AHMA has selected today - Saturday, June 25th - to be our "Under the Hat" day.

Do you live with a headache disorder? Share your story!

Share your story, along with a photo of yourself wearing a hat, to Facebook or Twitter OR create a video story and post it to YouTube, including the hashtags ‪#‎underthehat‬ ‪#‎MHAM‬ and Twitter handle @AHMAOrg

You can find helpful tips on participating here: http://www.europeanheadachealliance.org/under-the-hat/

Please include the logo shown here.

Spread the word to your friends and family so they can join in the fun!

 

Live well,

PurpleRibbonTiny Teri1

 

 because a migraine is NOT "just a headache"

Visit MigraineDisease.com

 

Follow me on    or 
 

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape© Teri Robert, 2016.


Health Education = Better Outcomes for Headache and Migraine Patients

MHAM16SMC250Today is day #19 of the 2016 Migraine and Headache Awareness Month Social Media Challenge. Today's prompt is:

#Headache and #Migraine patients educated about their disorder have better outcomes. #MHAM

There are many benefits to educating ourselves about our Migraines and Headaches:

  • It helps us be more capable of working with our doctors as treatment partners.
  • It prepares us to share information with other people in order to raise awareness and reduce social stigma.
  • Understanding our Headache disorders better makes them less mysterious and frightening for us.

And, here's another enormous benefit to educating ourselves - Research has shown that patients who are better educated about their health issues have better outcomes. Who wouldn't love that?

So, here's to continuing to learn and better Migraine and Headache Management!

Live well,

PurpleRibbonTiny Teri1

 

 because a migraine is NOT "just a headache"

Visit MigraineDisease.com

 

Follow me on    or 
 

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape© Teri Robert, 2016.

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Migraine Can and Does Kill Through Stroke and Suicide

MHAM16SMC350Today is day #5 of the 2016 Migraine and Headache Awareness Month Social Media Challenge. Today's prompt is:

#Migraine can and does kill through stroke and suicide. #MHAM

It's one of the things about Migraine that nobody wants to talk about. Migraine can kill. No, you'll probably never see it listed as a cause of death, but Migraine can and does kill. This is one reason I truly detest seeing someone say, "This Migraine is killing me." Whenever I see someone Tweet that or say it elsewhere online, I think to myself, "If it were, you wouldn't be at your computer or on your phone or tablet."

                         

One way Migraine can kill is by causing a stroke that proves fatal. Thankfully, this isn't very common, but it does happen. This accentuates how vitally important it is for us to contact our doctors or seek emergency care if we experience new Migraine symptoms that are frightening or especially severe. So many of the symptoms we can experience during a Migraine attack can also be stroke symptoms. My Migraine specialist, Dr. David Watson, was asked how we can tell if some of these symptoms are stroke or Migraine. His reply was that there are times when we truly can't tell by ourselves, and if there's ever a question, we should seek immediate care. Better a false alarm than a stroke that doesn't get timely treatment.

 

Sorrowfully, the pain, other debilitating symptoms, isolation, fear, and social stigma that go with Migraine disease has led far too many people to lose all hope and take their own lives. It's heart-wrenching when this happens to ANYONE, and it's especially so when it happens to younger people with so much of their lives ahead of them. I've known this to happen with Migraineurs as young as 14-years-old, and it's beyond tragic.

 

Some people contend that it's not Migraine, but stroke and suicide that takes these lives. Although they may have a technical point, it's time they wake up and get a clue. That's almost like saying that drunk divers don't kill - it's the injuries from the car wrecks that kill. Anyone with an ounce of compassion doesn't argue the point. They accept that both drunk drivers and Migraine kill.

 

As we strive to raise awareness and improve the lives of everyone with Migraine and other Headache disorders, one of the most valuable tools we have is knowledge. To us it properly, we have to admit even the painful facts to ourselves and share them with others. We have to bring facts out into the light rather than leaving them in the shadows to fester and cause harm.

 

Please Join Us In This Year's
Migraine and Headache Awareness Month Activities!

 

Live well,

PurpleRibbonTiny Teri1

 

 because a migraine is NOT "just a headache"

Visit MigraineDisease.com

 

Follow me on    or 
 

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape© Teri Robert, 2016.

 


FDA Evaluating Risk of Burns from Zecuity Migraine Patch

ZecuityIf you're using the Zecuity sumatriptan patch for Migraine, you should be aware that the FDA is investigating the risk of burns and scars from use of the patch.

FDA's MedWatch issued this alert on June 2, 2016:

ISSUE: FDA is investigating the risk of serious burns and potential permanent scarring with the use of Zecuity (sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system) patch for migraine headaches. Since marketing of the Zecuity patch began in September 2015, a large number of patients have reported they experienced burns or scars on the skin where the patch was worn. The reports included descriptions of severe redness, pain, skin discoloration, blistering, and cracked skin. As a result, FDA is investigating these serious adverse events to determine whether future regulatory action is needed, and will update the public with new information when the FDA review is complete.

BACKGROUND: The Zecuity patch contains the active ingredient sumatriptan, a prescription medicine used to treat acute migraine headaches in adults. The patch delivery system is designed to deliver a dose of medicine by way of a single-use, battery-powered patch that is wrapped around the upper arm or thigh. It should remain in place for no longer than four hours.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients who experience moderate to severe pain at the Zecuity patch site should immediately remove it to avoid possible burns or scarring, regardless of how long the patch has been worn, and contact your health care professional. Do not bathe, shower, or swim while wearing the patch. Read the Patient Information leaflet and the Instructions for Use section in the drug label, and talk with your health care professional if you have any questions or concerns.

Health care professionals should advise patients who complain of moderate to severe pain at the application site to remove the Zecuity patch immediately. Consider a different formulation of sumatriptan or switch these patients to an alternative migraine medicine. Evaluate patients and the application site as needed.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of this product to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report
  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

As stated above, if you're using the Zecuity patch and experience any issues related to this warning, remove the patch immediately and contact your doctor. Your doctor should then report the issue to MedWatch.

____________
Source:

FDA "Zecuity (sumatriptan) Migraine Patch: Drug Safety Communication - FDA Evaluating Risk of Burns and Scars." FDA MedWatch. June 2, 2016.
    

Live well,

PurpleRibbonTiny Teri1

 

 because a migraine is NOT "just a headache"

Visit MigraineDisease.com

 

Follow me on    or 
 

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape© Teri Robert, 2016.


Migraine and Headache Awareness Month Activities, Images, and More

NMAHM2016JoinUsDo you have Migraine, Cluster Headache, or another Headache disorder - or care about someone who does? Almost everyone knows someone with a Headache disorder. Whether one or more of these disorders impacts you directly or through people you know, I hope you'll join us this month - Migraine and Headache Awareness Month (MHAM) - in our efforts to raise awareness and improve lives.

One of the most important aspects of MHAM is getting accurate and compelling facts out in view of the general public to dispel myths and misconceptions and to reduce the social stigma associated with Cluster Headache, Migraine, Post-Traumatic Headache, and all other Headache disorders.

Many people are generating creative ways to observe MHAM, and there are some organized efforts that everyone can join.

In previous years, there's been a MHAM Blogging Challenge. It's been great. This year, to involve more people, the Blogging Challenge morphed into the Migraine and Headache Awareness Month Social Media Challenge. I provided a "prompt," which is a fact to be used for each day of the month, and a logo to go with them.

Here's how it works:

  • MHAM16SMC150To participate in the Social Media Challenge, you need to use the fact in your blog and /or on one or more other social media platform - Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc., using the hashtag #MHAM.
  • You don't have to manage to participate every day to accept the challenge. We know that some of us simply won't feel up to it every day, so participate as much as you can.
  • If you use an image, please use the Social Media Challenge logo (without changing it), which you can see here. I'll add it in a few different sizes at the end of this post so you can get it.

You can find all the prompts and more info in my post Migraine and Headache Awareness Month Social Media Challenge.

People are also having great fun changing their Facebook profile and cover images to Awareness Month images. I've created one of each that I'll add below. You're welcome to use them. If you do, please do not make any changes to them.

The month is off to a strong start with bloggers writing about it and people Tweeting and posting on Facebook about it. I hope you'll join us to reach more people and make it even stronger. There are images below for Facebook and for general use. If you have any problems with getting the images, or if you have any questions, please contact me through the email link at the top of the right column of this page.

Live well,

PurpleRibbonTiny Teri1

 

 because a migraine is NOT "just a headache"

Visit MigraineDisease.com

 

Follow me on    or 
 

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape© Teri Robert, 2016.

 

All images ©Teri Robert, 2016. You're welcome to use them in conjunction with Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, but they must be used without any changes or additions.

Facebook profile image:
2016FBProfile

Facebook cover image:
MHAM16

 Awareness Month Logo:
   NMAHM2016B325
NMAHM2016B500
Awareness Month Social Media Challenge Logo:
MHAM16SMC250  MHAM16SMC350


NMAHM2016B500